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A mature Black Swan measures between 110 and 142 cm (43-56 in) in length and weighs 3.7–9 kg (8.1-20 lbs). Its wing span is between 1.6 and 2 metres (5.3-6.5 ft). Relative to their size, black swans have longer necks than any other swan species.
2015-05-11T02:23:01+00:00

A mature Black Swan measures between 110 and 142 cm (43-56 in) in length and weighs 3.7–9 kg (8.1-20 lbs). Its wing span is between 1.6 and 2 metres (5.3-6.5 ft). Relative to their size, black swans have longer necks View Full →

Swan eggs hatch after about 45 days of incubation.
2015-05-11T02:21:17+00:00

Swan eggs hatch after about 45 days of incubation.

The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach a length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3m (10 ft)
2015-05-11T02:22:22+00:00

The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach a length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) View Full →

Black swans occur over large parts of Australia, with estimates of their range varying from 1 to 10 million square kilometers.
2015-05-11T02:23:10+00:00

Black swans occur over large parts of Australia, with estimates of their range varying from 1 to 10 million square kilometers.

Black Swans were first seen by Europeans in 1697, when Willem de Vlamingh's expedition explored the Swan River, Western Australia. At that time, Europeans refused to believe in their existence and were only convinced once de Vlamingh managed to dispatch a couple of specimens to Batavia.
2015-05-11T02:23:56+00:00

Black Swans were first seen by Europeans in 1697, when Willem de Vlamingh’s expedition explored the Swan River, Western Australia. At that time, Europeans refused to believe in their existence and were only convinced once de Vlamingh managed to dispatch View Full →